God and State-of-Being Verbs

In my homeschool group we recently discussed a simple sentence:

“He is in the car.”

First, we remove prepositional phrases before we figure out the main sentence pattern, and in this case we removed “in the car” which left “He is.” Someone insisted that couldn’t be right–how can “He is” stand alone as a sentence? It didn’t seem to make good sense.

Divine CreationMy mind immediately jumped back to Exodus 3.6 where God introduced Himself: “I am the God of Abraham…” A little later in Moses’ fearful discussion with God, he asked God how He would like to be introduced to Israel. God responded with, “I AM WHO I AM…Say this to the people of Israel, ‘I AM has sent me to you.'” (Exod. 3.13-14).

I would never say “Nathan is” without a greater context. Maybe if someone asked, “Who is hungry?” I might answer, “Nathan is,” or in the first person, “I am.” But you understand I’m saying “Nathan is hungry,” “I am hungry.” There would be a qualification after the state-of-being verb to tell you just what I am.

A well-known maxim goes thus: “I think, therefore I am,” expressing in a cute, philosophical way our existence. But we know there was I time when we were not, and there is coming a time when we will not be on this earth and in this body.

In the BeginningGod is (of course) totally unique and different from us! We CAN say simply “He is.” He just is. He exists. The state-of-being verb simply says God exists, and that’s all there is to it. Is there a greater context? There is NO greater context than Him!

This is why the Jews became so upset with Jesus in John 8.57-59 when they asked Jesus, “You are not yet fifty years old, and have you seen Abraham?” Jesus responded, “Truly, truly I say to you, before Abraham was, I am.” In this way, Jesus identified Himself with God, nay, as God. Understandably, the Jews attempted to stone Him for that, not stopping to really ponder the ramifications of His words or His mighty deeds.

God is. Jesus is. The Holy Spirit is. Together, they are the One “who is and who was and who is to come” (Rev. 1.4, 8; 4.8), “the Alpha and the Omega” (Rev. 1.8), “the first and the last” (Rev. 1.17; 2.8), “the beginning and the end” (Rev. 22.13), “the living God, enduring forever” (Dan. 6.26), “the Ancient of Days” (Dan. 7.9), who has always been from “in the beginning” (John 1.1; Gen. 1.1).

We began. God instigated our beginning. He had no beginning and will have no end. He is the great singular cause of all things.

He is!