Habits Every Christian Should Have: Speaking Truth

Just as Satan is the father of lies and liars, so God is the Father of truth-tellers and truth-seekers.

No place for a deceiver exists among the people of God. It is said of Jesus, “No deception was found in His mouth,” and that’s exactly what the Father wants from His children.

There are six things that the Lord hates,
seven that are an abomination to Him:
haughty eyes, a lying tongue,
and hands that shed innocent blood,
a heart that devises wicked plans,
feed that make haste to run to evil,
a false witness who breathes out lies,
and one who sows discord among brothers. (Proverbs 6.16-19)

Part of growing up in Christ is learning to speak the truth in love (Ephesians 4.15).

It’s one thing to speak truth with a neighbor and another to temper that truth with love. I’d love to tell everyone what their glaring faults are and how to fix them–isn’t that truthful? Perhaps. But it probably misses the mark of love by a wide margin. When I’m so focused on others’ faults and foibles, I tend to also miss my own, pride creeps in, and I end up looking down upon my brothers and sisters. So love must temper truth.

However, we must always speak the truth with one another.

Have you ever seen an adult lie to a child? This kills me. A father didn’t want his child to know he kept guns in the case, so he told the child the case held his fishing rods. What happens when the child finds out what’s really in the case? Perhaps he doesn’t explicitly connect the dots (“Dad’s a liar!”), but at least subconsciously he learns it is okay to lie to cover things up.

What’s worse is when a parent outright lies to another adult in front of the child–“No, my husband’s not home right now; you’ll have to call back later,” while said husband sits in the living room watching TV. The child learns lying is okay in order to avoid inconvenience.

Lying kills trust. If you lie to me even about a small matter, it then makes me wonder about anything you say in the future. If you’re okay twisting, tweaking, or otherwise adjusting the truth, I lose confidence in your word overall.

Is there a path to redemption after you lie? Can trust be rebuilt? Yes, it can. But trust is earned over a long period of time, and once trust is betrayed, rebuilding it requires another long road of consistent truthfulness.

Therefore, having put away falsehood, let each one of you speak the truth with his neighbor, for we are members one of another (Ephesians 4.25).

Lying lips are an abomination to the Lord, but those who act faithfully are His delight (Proverbs 12.22).

Christian Habits: Dwelling on the Word

When we were of the world, we thought and acted like them, but now that we know Christ (or rather are known by Him) our habits have changed (and are changing). You must be “transformed by the renewal of your mind” (Romans 12.2), an inward change which results in a new lifestyle.

Take the apostle Paul for example. After fighting tooth-and-nail against the Christian “sect” (as he saw them), Christ knocked him into the dirt and showed him how much he would have to suffer for Christ. Immediately he reversed course, as he began to publicly proclaim Jesus as the Messiah, reasoning with anyone who would listen. One day he killed Christians; the next he loved and joined them.

So it is with all Christians–there is a definite change in our habits. One day we are of the “sons of disobedience” (Ephesians 2.2); the next we are falling on our knees praying to Jesus as Lord and King, submitting to His every command. One day we wonder what this whole “Christianity” thing is about; the next we cling tightly to our Bible, knowing it is the inspired and holy word of God.

Not everyone’s conversion feels quite so dramatic, but we must understand the change involved in stepping from the world into the family of God.

One of the first signs of a changed heart, a converted mind, a reborn soul is that intense love for God’s word as absolute, bedrock, divine truth. Paul prays for the Ephesian Christians:

Eph. 1.15 For this reason I too, having heard of the faith in the Lord Jesus which exists among you and your love for all the saints, 16 do not cease giving thanks for you, while making mention of you in my prayers; 17 that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give to you a spirit of wisdom and of revelation in the knowledge of Him. 18 I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened, so that you will know what is the hope of His calling, what are the riches of the glory of His inheritance in the saints, 19 and what is the surpassing greatness of His power toward us who believe.

Paul wanted the Christians to know certain things about God and about their salvation. How would they come to know these things?

Eph. 3.3 …by revelation there was made known to me the mystery, as I wrote before in brief. 4 By referring to this, when you read you can understand my insight into the mystery of Christ, 5 which in other generations was not made known to the sons of men, as it has now been revealed to His holy apostles and prophets in the Spirit; 6 to be specific, that the Gentiles are fellow heirs and fellow members of the body, and fellow partakers of the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel, 7 of which I was made a minister, according to the gift of God’s grace which was given to me according to the working of His power. 8 To me, the very least of all saints, this grace was given, to preach to the Gentiles the unfathomable riches of Christ, 9 and to bring to light what is the administration of the mystery which for ages has been hidden in God who created all things; 10 so that the manifold wisdom of God might now be made known through the church to the rulers and the authorities in the heavenly places.

Through the Holy Spirit, God made known to Paul the mystery of the gospel. Paul wrote it down, and he preached and taught that gospel. Those are the means by which God chose to continue revealing the gospel of His Son–through the reading and teaching of Scripture.

God put the church together in great part to give us an environment which fosters growth in the word.

Eph. 4.11 And He gave some as apostles, and some as prophets, and some as evangelists, and some as pastors and teachers, 12 for the equipping of the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ; 13 until we all attain to the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a mature man, to the measure of the stature which belongs to the fullness of Christ. 14 As a result, we are no longer to be children, tossed here and there by waves and carried about by every wind of doctrine, by the trickery of men, by craftiness in deceitful scheming; 15 but speaking the truth in love, we are to grow up in all aspects into Him who is the head, even Christ, 16 from whom the whole body, being fitted and held together by what every joint supplies, according to the proper working of each individual part, causes the growth of the body for the building up of itself in love.

All those gifts God gave the church in verse 11 have to do with teaching and preaching at some level–the passing along of God’s word. Notice the benefits of staying in the word and continuing in a steady teaching / learning environment:

  • You will be built up in Christ
  • You will attain the unity of the faith
  • You will come to know the Son of God
  • You will grow up in Christ
  • You will take part in the growth of the whole body of Christ, the church

Every Christian should habitually be in the word, whether it’s listening to the Bible read or taught (by a competent teacher!) or reading and studying for himself. Is your life characterized by a love for the word and a continual hungering and thirsting for righteousness?

STAY IN THE WORD!

A Recipe for Life-long Accountability

As I was reading a helpful little online book called Coming Clean, I ran across this question:

What if we were meant to treat accountability not as a last resort but as a lifestyle?

The author then proceeded to recount a few of the many “one another” passages of the New Testament, which show how we really should work together to overcome sin and walk in righteousness! What should we be doing with one another which builds biblical accountability?

James does not suggest, he commands that we confess our sins to one another and pray for one another. God intends for His people to share their struggles with one another! As a mighty weapon against the forces of evil, prayer remains one of God’s greatest gifts to us, and we should be in regular and constant prayer for one another’s burdens and sins.

How can you bear your brother’s burden if you don’t know what his burden is? Sometimes the weight is so great everyone around can clearly see. If a man is staggering drunk, we plainly see his issue. If a frail old woman loses her husband, we understand she carries a great burden. But how many of us carry unseen, secret weights–burdens of which we are so ashamed that we dare not reveal them to our friends? Satan would have us too ashamed to share, because then we would never find relief. But God wants our burdens lightened–even lifted!

Unless I know your temptation struggles, I won’t know exactly how to encourage you against the deceitfulness of those sins. If you tell me you struggle with gluttony, I can help you remember there is no lasting satisfaction in indulging your appetite. If you tell me you struggle with pornography, I can remind you of the immense dangers lurking for your soul in that dark, evil world; and I can tell you of the purity and sanctity of the marriage bed and of how wonderfully fulfilling God has made it to be.

In short, God expects us to love one another, encourage one another, confess to one another, and pray for one another. Sounds like a recipe for life-long accountability! God has so arranged the Body of Christ, the Church, that we might together overcome sin, resist temptation, and move toward righteousness.

Are we taking advantage of God’s blessings through His church?